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Mixtape Vol. 10—Race and Technology

Race and technology are two of the most powerful motifs in American history, but until recently they were not considered in relation to each other. Enslaved Africans brought with them the techniques of rice cultivation that proved profitable to their Southern white owners depended heavily on black skills. This Mixtape series features the continued work of black innovators, a Cannabis Camp in California, African Entrepreneurship with Arab Women, and nationally Black Girls Coding.



Their dark skin, their gender, their economic status-none of those were acceptable excuses for not giving the fullest rein to their imaginations and ambitions.”

Margot Lee Shetterly (author Hidden Figures)

Three Arab Women Innovators Factor in on the Economic Benefits of Backing Female Entrepreneurship | Podcast


africantechroundup.com/arab-women-entrepreneurship/

In this conversation, Andile Masuku is joined by Hala Bugaighis, founder of Jusoor Center for Studies and Development in Libya; Jumana Salous, Project Manager at Business Women Forum - Palestine; and from Jordan, Lamia Tarabiah who is the founder of Nawaret Haretna Support Centre for Women.



One with Farai | Podcast


pri.org/programs/one-farai/hacking-race-and-technology


Farai Chideya speaks with engineer-turned-nonprofit CEO Kimberly Bryant. Her daughter's mixed experiences in early tech education led Bryant to found Black Girls Code, which offers hands-on instruction in cities across the United States.



African- American Cannabis Company Launches New Tech-Driven Smart Packaging | Article


marijuanareform.org/african-american-cannabis-company-launches-new-tech-driven-smart-packaging-experience-california/


Yolo County, California – Established in 2013, Camp Green is a licensed California cannabis company owned and operated by African Americans in Yolo County, California. For more information, campgreeninc.com



Technology and the African-American Experience: Needs and Opportunities for Study | Article by Bruce Sinclair


This collection of essays examines the intersection of the two in a variety of social and technological contexts. The essays challenge what editor Bruce Sinclair calls the "myth of black disingenuity"—the historical perception that black people were technically incompetent.


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